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The Unit was established in 1993 and its role is to give additional income to the farmer by processing his farm wastes. The Unit conducts research and development into production of animal feed from cocoa pod husks, toilet soap and cosmetics from cocoa butter extracted from discarded beans; alcoholic beverages and industrial alcohol, soft drinks, marmalade/jelly, pectin, theobromine and acetic acid from cocoa sweatings. Its also conducts research and development into production of toilet soap and cosmetics from shea butter and alcoholic beverages and jam from cashew. It assesses the economic and commercial viability of large scale production of the products.

Mandate:

The Unit is to help farmers generate extra income through the processing of their produce and by-products.

  • by conducting research into the development of useful and quality products from these farm produce and their by-products.
  • assessing the economic viability of the products made.
Cocoa

In the processing of cocoa beans for the market, the pod husk, bean pulp juice and the placenta, which constitute 66, 4 and 10% respectively of the fruit are traditionally discarded as waste. Research carried out at CRIG from 1970 to 1983 demonstrated that these wastes could be processed into commercially useful products. These products are as follows:

   
From the pod husk animal feed for ruminants, pigs, rabbits and poultry
potash for soft soap manufacture
From pulp juice wine, vinegar, alcohol, jam, pectin and soft drink
From discarded beans cocoa butter pomade and soap

Since 1993 to date appreciable quantities of some of these products have been produced and marketed. Data on production cost and marketing were generated for feasibility studies.

Cashew

In 2003 research into the development of non-traditional products from cashew begun and since then some of these products have been and marketed.

   
From apple pulp animal feed for pigs and poultry
From apple juice wine, vinegar, alcohol, jam and soft drink
From cashew nut shell briquettes and CNSL
Shea

Products from shea pulp and butter have been developed. Some of them are still in their developmental stages whilst others are being studied for their economic viability.

   
From shea pulp wine, vinegar and jam
From shea butter cosmetics and soap